Skip to content
Skip to navigation menu

English

Kuwait

Cyflwynir y tudalen hwn yn Saesneg am nad yw wedi'i gyfieithu i'r Gymraeg hyd yn hyn.

Os hoffech i’r dudalen hon gael ei chyfieithu fel mater o flaenoriaeth, anfonwch gyfeiriad y dudalen hon at web@cardiff.ac.uk

Cardiff University has a long tradition of welcoming students from Kuwait. Students are enrolled in a wide range of undergraduate, postgraduate and English language programmes within the University.

The University has since developed a good understanding of the Kuwaiti education system and is a recognised institution by the major sponsors in Kuwait.

Foundation courses

If you have graduated from the Kuwaiti High School, you will be required to successfully complete a one year International Foundation Programme before entering Cardiff University's undergraduate programmes.

You will also need an overall average of 85% or above in the Shahadat-al-thanawia-al-a’ama School Leaving Certificate, with at least 85% in key subject areas to qualify for the International Foundation Programme.

Undergraduate courses

You will be required to have GCE A-level qualifications or the International Baccalaureate (IB) to qualify for entry on to Cardiff University's undergraduate programmes.

If you have graduated with the Shahadat-al-thanwia-al-a'ama, you will be required to complete the International Foundation Programme before starting an undergraduate programme at Cardiff University.

Postgraduate taught courses

You will be required to successfully complete a four year undergraduate degree (at a minimum GPA of 3.0) from a recognised institution to be considered for entry on to Cardiff University's postgraduate programmes.

Postgraduate research programmes

You will be required to provide evidence that you have already carried out research, usually via the successful completion of a relevant master's degree.

English language

A relevant English language qualification is also required — normally a minimum of 6.5 IELTS, however, this may vary from course to course.

If you are unsure of your qualifications or entry requirements please contact the International Office.

Representatives from the International Office visit Kuwait regularly throughout the year. Details of our next visit will appear here shortly.

For further information regarding our visits please contact us at international@cardiff.ac.uk.

Nour Alnaaji

Nour Alnaaji

Course Title: BSc Business Management
Country: Jordan

Year of Graduation: 2016


Nour comes from Jordan and is in her second year of her Business Management degree. After graduating she hopes to carry on with a postgraduate degree. In this summer Nour will be completing an internship, which she hopes will continue into a graduate scheme after she finishes her post graduate degree.

As a Student at Cardiff University
Why did you choose Cardiff?

Cardiff University has a strong reputation, as a member of the Russell group. When doing my research for universities to apply for, Cardiff captured my attention as a city that has so much to offer. The student population is high, and there is something for everyone. I chose Cardiff because of its diversity.

Tell us about your course. How is it different to classes back home?

I am studying Business Management. The course differs from classes back at home as it offers a vast amount of career opportunities. It holds talks by entrepreneurs, career information sessions and even career fairs. The course also offers a scheme called "Business management with integrated work scheme". This gives people the opportunity to go on placement during the second semester of their second year. Besides the great career support, the course also ensures application of theory, through independent or group coursework, or sometimes even through promoting related opportunities locally.

What you have enjoyed most about studying at Cardiff University?

I have definitely enjoyed my studies, however I have enjoyed the extracurricular activities the most! Cardiff University offers a variety of societies and clubs, and even career related extracurricular activities, which are a great way of making friends and learning new skills.

Life in Cardiff
What is the best thing about living in Cardiff?

The best thing about living in Cardiff is the friendliness of the city. Cardiff also has a very high student population and great sights such as the Cardiff castle, St. Fagans or Pen-y-Fan.

Are you a member of any clubs and/or societies? What’s it like to be part of a society?

I am a member of the Tennis society and photography society. During my first year at university I was also part of the Model United Nations Society. Being part of a society is great because you can meet people with similar interests and can establish great friendships! It is also interesting as some societies organize various events throughout the year, visiting areas of Cardiff or enjoying restaurants and pubs in the city centre! It creates a great balance between your academic work and social activites!

Reflections
How has the University supported you during your time here?

The University’s support has been great even before arriving Cardiff! The university has trained teams in specific areas where students may need help such as financial issues, student advice, career centres etc. The university has supported me with advice when I have needed it and the friendly staff have made any issue I’ve had very easy to overcome! The University has been great at supporting me to develop my career skills, through offering a range of employability events and even work experience!

What would be your advice for prospective students thinking about coming to Cardiff?

My advice would be to come to Cardiff as it has got so much to offer! The university is great academically, being placed very high in the University rankings, and the city has a lot to offer. I also advise students not to stress about coming to Cardiff, the staff and students here are happy to help with any issues.

What are your plans for the future?

My plans at the moment are to carry on with a postgraduate degree, as I think it would be valuable for career opportunities. I will be completing an internship in the summer, which I am hoping will continue into a graduate scheme after I finish my post graduate degree. Currently I am very career focused, ensuring I make the most out of each opportunity the University gives me.

The university is great academically, being placed very high in the University rankings, and the city has a lot to offer.

IDP Education

Shaab
Office Manager: Sujata Vora

Saqar Al Jazira Gen Trdg & Contracting Co.
Office #205, Al-Rabea Building
Salem Al-Mubarak Street Salmiya
Kuwait

Tel: +965 2574 3843
Email: info.kuwait@idp.com

Tariq Maruf

Tariq Maruf

Course Title: Bsc Accounting
Country: Kuwait

Year of Graduation: 2004
Current Employer: KPMG


Tariq recently moved from Kuwait to Canada to be part of the exciting oil and gas industry in Calgary. Facing brand new challenges both culturally and professionally, his colleagues wonder how he manages to get along with international clients and find common ground with almost everyone. Tariq attributes that life skill to his exposure at Cardiff University.

As a Student at Cardiff University
Why did you choose Cardiff to do your BSc?

I had a friend in school who was a brilliant student back in Kuwait. When she was going to the UK she told me “go and do your research, which ever university you choose, make sure they have a 5-star rating for the course that you want to do”. Cardiff had that rating and when I asked her about it, she said “oh you’ll love the city – I’ve been there myself and I think it would be a good place to go”. I didn’t know anyone in Cardiff per se but I heard that it was a good university with a good reputation.

I did a lot of research in terms of getting to know the place; what the university had to offer; how many students there were; how the course was structured, etc. I loved the course I did. Even looking back now, I remember doing the course on the Development of Accounting, a module in my third year. It was taught by one of the senior Professors at the University and it was purely about how accounting developed, the history of accounting and how things evolved.

Life after Graduation
Tell me about your brand new career in the oil and gas industry. What are your responsibilities?

Before I moved to Calgary I was working with clients from the retail and manufacturing sector and the questions I asked on a daily basis were: ‘is the inventory going to go obsolete?’ ‘Are they counting the inventory properly?’ ‘How are the sales going?’ ‘How is recession affecting sales?’

Now that I have been referred to KPMG and am working with clients in the oil and gas industry, everyday it is more about ‘upstream’, ‘downstream’ and ‘royalties’. It’s a steep learning curve every day. It’s a completely different industry, the whole business model is different and the operations are different.

What sort of audit work do you do on a daily basis?

Performing financial audits serves one major purpose - giving credibility to the company’s Financial Statements. This could serve different companies in different ways. For example, it helps a private company when it is looking to be bought out or it goes public and gets listed on the stock exchange. When our clients tell their stakeholders that they’ve had revenues of X million and X amount of profit, we give our opinion as auditors commenting whether the statements are reasonable and if they are true and fair. We bridge gaps between the company and its stakeholders - investors, governments and tax authorities.

What are your day-to-day responsibilities?

My main role is the senior-in-charge of audit engagements. I’m not the one to initiate any client relationships but I do have to make sure that everything runs smoothly. The manager has ultimate responsibility for everything, but I am the person ‘in charge’ that the manager relies on and trusts.

It’s hard to stipulate what we do on a daily basis because it changes frequently. For example, we changed audit tool last week and we’re transitioning from the old package. We’ve had to go through training and sort out teething problems. It’s been quite a challenge to make sure that things get transferred properly, that the files make sense. So the past few weeks we’ve just been busy doing interim planning for the year end audits.

Reflections
And what important lessons did you learn in Cardiff that you carry with you to this day?

Before coming to Cardiff I always lived in a very sheltered, protected environment in Kuwait. When I came to Cardiff I was like “wow, this is a different world”. I guess it was more of the social aspects that really struck me the most. It equipped me with how to live and to understand people on a social level. So when I started working with different people I got along a lot easier and my social skills improved a lot more. It definitely made me a different person.

So, Cardiff developed the social side of you?

Oh for sure. When I was in Ernst & Young in Kuwait, I was working with Arabs, Africans, South Asians and people from the Far East. I would be the one who would get on with everyone and people would be like “how do you do that? What do you talk to him about?” It’s about finding that common ground. It’s easier because living in Cardiff gave me that experience, without a shadow of a doubt.

What would you say to a prospective student from Kuwait who wanted to study in Cardiff?

Speaking to an international student, I would say Cardiff was the place that made me what I am today. Without a doubt! That says a lot in itself. The social aspects; the academic structures; the course; amazing professors and tutors that I interacted with and who I’m still in touch with. Speaking for my accounting course, I would say it’s extremely strong and that it gave me the technical skills professionally and the ability to think outside the box.

Cardiff was the place that made me what I am today.

Student views

My professors were very clear about their ideas and they frequently evaluate your academic progress, which I found to be very good.

Joseph Albat, LLM

The best place to escape from the hectic life of the city is the countryside. If the weather allows it, enjoying the beauty of the Welsh countryside is always my first choice to spend my spare time.

Salah Waheedi, Community Pharmacy (PG)

Patrick Cosh
Cardiff Contact - Patrick Cosh

Hello. I’m Patrick Cosh and I’ve been Country Manager for Kuwait since 2012. I’m a Cardiff University alumnus and studied Modern History and Politics at the University, graduating in 2004.

I visit Kuwait several times a year, and my role involves guiding and assisting Kuwaiti students applying to Cardiff. As well as meeting with prospective students on my trips to Kuwait, I work closely with Embassies and other partner organisations of the University

Please do feel free to let me know if you have any questions about studying at Cardiff University, as I will be very happy to advise further.

Clubs & societies

Cardiff University Islamic Society

The Cardiff University Islamic Society (Cardiff ISoc) is an organisation formed by students, for students to increase understanding about the religion of Islam. Cardiff ISoc runs events throughout the year, ranging from socials to sporting events, open to all.

Cardiff University Islamic Society

Useful links

International

Prospectus

2013 International brochure

Download or request our prospectus for International students.



Download PDF Request a copy