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Cyflwynir y tudalen hwn yn Saesneg am nad yw wedi'i gyfieithu i'r Gymraeg hyd yn hyn.

Os hoffech i’r dudalen hon gael ei chyfieithu fel mater o flaenoriaeth, anfonwch gyfeiriad y dudalen hon at publicity@cardiff.ac.uk

Double success for School of Medicine

09 Mai 2007

One of Cardiff University’s young researchers has just picked up more than US$100,000 (just over £50,000) in major awards..

Dr Danny Smith a Clinical Lecturer in the Department of Psychological Medicine won US$45,000 to support a research project from the American Psychiatric Association’s AstraZeneca International ‘Young Minds in Psychiatry’ Award. The awards aim to foster the development of promising researchers around the world and are based on applicants’ research careers and the originality of their proposals.

The award was won for Dr Smith’s proposal to explore the clinical and genetic overlap between unipolar depression and bipolar spectrum disorders. The project will be supervised by Professor Nick Craddock at the School of Medicine and will contribute to better classification of mood disorders in the long term.

Dr Smith followed up this success with a Young Investigator Award 2007 from another major American research funder, the National Association for Research into Schizophrenia and Depression. The award is another unrestricted grant to support his research, this time of US$60,000, for a similar project on mood disorders.

Dr Smith was appointed by the School of Medicine in February 2006, shortly after he completed his MD at the University of Edinburgh. He aims to develop a research interest in the clinical and genetic aspects of mood disorders within the Department of Psychological Medicine’s Mood Disorders Research Group.

The Head of the Department of Psychological Medicine Professor Mike Owen said: "This is a fine achievement against stiff international competition. It’s a tribute to Danny and underlines the commitment of the Cardiff department to develop a cadre of clinical researchers who are able to translate findings from basic research into benefit for patients."