Skip to content
Skip to navigation menu

English

Cyflwynir y tudalen hwn yn Saesneg am nad yw wedi'i gyfieithu i'r Gymraeg hyd yn hyn.

Os hoffech i’r dudalen hon gael ei chyfieithu fel mater o flaenoriaeth, anfonwch gyfeiriad y dudalen hon at publicity@cardiff.ac.uk

Search for the scientists to follow in Nobel winners’ footsteps

03 Tachwedd 2008

The School of Biosciences has launched a new Research Fellowship Programme for early career scientists, named in honour of its two Nobel Laureates.

Professor Sir Martin Evans and Professor Dr Robert Huber are both members of the School. Professor Sir Martin won the 2007 Nobel Prize for Medicine for his discoveries on stem cells while Professor Huber won the 1988 Prize for Chemistry for work on the three-dimensional structure of a photosynthetic reaction centre.

Now Cardiff School of Biosciences is launching the Martin Evans/Robert Huber Research Fellowship Programme, designed to give promising international-calibre researchers a jump start to their independent research careers.

The programme aims to provide young researchers with the best possible start to their independent science careers by nurturing them through this critical stage. The School of Biosciences offers a world-class research environment and a wide range of world-leading research. By providing initial financial support, the Martin Evans/Robert Huber Fellowship Programme will catalyse success in seeking major external funding and provide a headstart for the School’s next generation of bioscientists in their pursuit of personal research excellence.

The School will initiate the Programme with two research fellows, offering more Fellowships as funding becomes available. An international recruitment exercise is under way, looking for high-quality applicants across the full range of the School’s research interests. The first appointments are expected to be made in the New Year.

Professor Sir Martin Evans said: "The transition from being a member of a research team to leading a project of your own can often be difficult. I’m delighted that the School of Biosciences has introduced this Programme to help researchers make the leap."

Professor Dr Robert Huber, who is leading the development of Structural Biology at the University, said: "The School of Biosciences has an international reputation for the quality of its research. We look forward to seeing more world-class research projects develop as a result of this new Fellowship."

Tags

More Tags